Moving Out After Living with an Abuser

No one deserves to be abused.  If you are reading this page, you have likely already taken steps to end the abusive relationship.  Unfortunately, the risk of danger does not always end after you’ve left an abuser.  Ending an abusive relationship comes with a different set of dangers, and you still need to take steps to keep yourself safe.

Following these suggestions (often known as a safety plan) can’t guarantee your safety, but it could help make you safer.  However, it is important that you create a safety plan that is right for you.  Not all of these suggestions will work for everyone, and some could even place you in greater danger.  You have to do what you think is best to keep yourself and your children safe.

Steps to take if the abuser has permanently moved out of your home

Here are some suggestions to try to help keep you safe if the abuser has permanently moved out of your home – he may have left willingly or, more likely, due to a restraining order.

  • Change your locks so he can’t enter the home with his key – even if he left his key with you, he may have other copies that you don’t know about.  If you rent your home, you may have to talk to your landlord first before changing the lock.
  • Put dead bolt locks on your door.  If you can, replace any wood doors with steel or metal doors.  If you rent your home, be sure to talk to your landlord first before changing the doors.
  • If you have the money, think about installing a security system.
  • Try to make sure that the outside of your house is well-lit.  Think about getting a lighting system that lights up when a person is coming close to the house (i.e. motion-sensitive lights).
  • Keep bushes, trees, and other plants around your house well-trimmed.  That way, you’ll be able to see if someone approaches your home.   Trimmed bushes would also make it harder for the abuser to hide in the bushes without being seen by a passerby or neighbor.
  • Change your phone number.  Ask the telephone company to make your new number unlisted in the phonebook.
  • Call the telephone company to request caller ID and to block unlisted calls so that you can see the number of anyone who calls you.  Ask that your phone number be blocked so that if you call someone else no one will learn your new, unlisted phone number.
  • If you can change the hours that you work.
  • When you’re taking the children to school, take different routes.  Avoid the route you took when you and the abuser were together.
  • Explain your situation to anyone who takes care of your children or anyone who picks them up from school.  If the abuser is not allowed to be near the children, let these people know this and even give them a copy of your restraining order.
  • Take a different route to the grocery store, bank, restaurants, and any other place you go on a regular basis or find new ones to go to if you can.
  • Try not to travel alone.  Stay in public, well-lit places as much as you can.
  • Avoid walking or jogging alone.
  • Keep a certified copy of your restraining order with you at all times, if you have one.
  • Let friends, neighbors, and employers know that you have a restraining order in effect and to let you know if they see the abuser around your home or work.  Give them a picture of him if they don’t know what he looks like.
  • Give copies of your restraining order to your neighbors, employers and your children’s schools.  Also, give them a picture of the abuser.
  • If you feel that it would not negatively affect your job, you might want to tell people you work with about the situation.  See if a receptionist or someone else can screen your calls.
  • Remember that you can call law enforcement if the abuser violates your restraining order.  If you don’t have a restraining order, you can still call the police if the abuser comes to your home uninvited.
  • Carry a cell phone if you can, but don’t completely depend on this phone.  Cell phones may not get good service in some places, and batteries do run out.  Ask your local domestic violence organization if they give out cell phones – if so, get one as a backup to the cell phone that you already have.  Have emergency numbers like 911 on speed dial.
  • If you need help in a public place, yell “FIRE!”  People respond more quickly to someone yelling “fire” than to any other cry for help.
  • Stay in touch with your local domestic violence organization for support.
  • Get a full check-up with your doctor to see if you need any medical treatment.  Keep in mind that the abuser may not have been faithful and so you may want to get tested for sexually transmitted diseases.

Steps to take if you have left the abuser and relocated to a confidential location

Here are some suggestions to try to help keep you safe and to prevent the abuser from learning where you live if you’ve moved to a confidential location.

  • Whenever you have to give out your address (such as at a doctor’s office or with a magazine subscription), use an address that’s different from the one where you’re actually living.  For example, think about renting a P.O. Box from your post office or ask a friend if you can use her address.
  • Be aware that addresses can be listed on restraining orders and police reports.  Before filling out your new address on any forms, ask if there’s any way to keep your address confidential.  If not, see if you can use the P.O. box or a friend’s address instead.
  • Ask the telephone company to make your new address and phone number unlisted in the phonebook.
  • Call the telephone company to request caller ID and to block unlisted calls so that you can see the number of anyone who calls you. Ask that your phone number be blocked so that if you call someone else no one will learn your new, unlisted phone number.
  • Be careful about ever giving out your new address and phone number.
  • If you can change the hours you work.
  • Keep a certified copy of your restraining order with you at all times, if you have one.
  • If you have children, let their school know what is going on.
  • Consider changing your children’s schools or, at the very least, change the route that you use to get them to school.  Drop them off at a different school entrance if possible.
  • Reschedule appointments that you made before leaving that the abuser may know about.
  • Take a different route to the grocery store, bank, restaurants, and any other place you go on a regular basis or find new ones if you can.
  • Consider telling your new neighbors about the situation.  Make a plan with them for when you need help.  Have a signal, like flashing the lights on and off or hanging something out the window, to tell them you need help in case the abuser gets into your home and you can’t get to the phone to call 911.
  • Talk to people you trust that you just left an abusive relationship so that they are on alert if they see anything suspicious around your home.
  • Put dead bolt locks on your doors.  If you can, replace any wood doors with steel or metal doors.  If you rent your home, be sure to talk to your landlord first before changing doors or even locks.
  • If you have the money, think about installing a security system.
  • Try to make sure that the outside of your house is well-lit.  Think about getting a lighting system that lights up when a person is coming close to the house (i.e. motion-sensitive lights).
  • Keep bushes, trees, and other plants around your house well-trimmed.  That way, you’ll be able to see if someone approaches your home.  Trimmed bushes would also make it harder for the abuser to hide in the bushes without being seen by a passerby or neighbor.
  • If you feel that it would not negatively affect your job, you might want to tell people you work with about the situation.  See if a receptionist or someone else can screen your calls.
  • Explain your situation to anyone who takes care of your children or anyone who pick them up from school.  If the abuser is not allowed to be near the children, let these people know this and even give them a copy of your restraining order.
  • Carry a cell phone if you can, but don’t completely depend on this phone.  Cell phones may not get good service in some places, and batteries do run out.  Ask your local domestic violence organization if they give out cell phones – if so, get one as a backup to the cell phone that you already have.  Have emergency numbers like 911 on speed dial.  You may also be eligible for a free phone with free minutes from the Assurance Wireless Program, sponsored by Virgin Moble.
  • If you need help in a public place, yell “FIRE!”  People respond more quickly to someone yelling “fire” than to any other cry for help.
  • Stay in touch with your local domestic violence organization and/or mental health service providers for support.  To find a domestic violence organization near you, go to our State and Local Programs page.
  • Get a full check-up with your doctor to see if you need medical treatment.  Keep in mind that the abuser may not have been faithful and you may want to get tested for sexually transmitted diseases.

Resource;

http://www.womenslaw.org

Domestic Shelters

Staying at a domestic violence shelter can be a very positive experience. You will possibly have a chance to meet and share your experiences with other women and children who have experienced domestic violence. You can learn more about resources such as assistance, addiction recovery programs, and parenting support. There are toys, games, and books for children. Safe Harbors is confidential, wheelchair accessible and free.

Staying at a domestic violence shelter can also be a challenging experience. You will be possibly sharing a living space with people you don’t know very well. There are many rules that you and your children will be asked to follow. These rules are meant to help ensure that your shelter experience is safe, secure and educational and that all residents are treated with respect and cultural sensitivity.

This guide is meant to help you understand the challenges and benefits of staying in a domestic violence shelter. Please keep in mind that rules and services change from shelter to shelter so it is best to ask each shelter about their rules and services.

What is a shelter like?

Shelters are often large homes converted for group living. There are common areas shared by all residents, such as a kitchen, living room, dining room, children’s playroom and laundry room. In many shelters, you will share a bedroom with other residents. Usually, you will have a bunk-bed, as well as a dresser or closet, are for your family to store clothing and a few bags of personal belongings. Most shelters do not have storage space but they do have playground areas, off-street parking and laundry facilities.

Does it cost anything to stay at a shelter?

Staying at a shelter is free. There are times shelters that require that you participate as a group. This means that, if you can, you will share the cost of buying food for meals that are shared.

How will a shelter help to keep me safe from my abuser?

For the safety of you and your children, most domestic violence shelters are in confidential locations. This will make it harder for your abuser to find you and probably will help you feel safer. If you are staying at a confidential shelter, you will not be able to tell anyone the location of the shelter, even family or friends (besides the children staying with you at the shelter). If you tell anyone where the shelter is, you will be asked to leave. You may not be able to return to that shelter in the future. Shelters also protect your privacy and safety by refusing to give out information about you to other programs and individuals without a release of information from you.

What services do shelters have for children?

Most shelters have children’s programs that are meant to provide age-appropriate, supportive services to children and youth. Children’s program staff are trained for working with children and mothers who have experienced crisis. Through educational groups, free play time, and individual meetings, these staff people offer support, domestic violence education, and encouragement to children and mothers.

What kind of rules do shelters have?

Shelters have rules (often called policies or guidelines) meant to help ensure that your shelter experiences are safe and educational and that all residents are treated with respect and cultural sensitivity. For example, you will be required to refrain from drinking alcohol or using illegal drugs while you are a resident. Child abuse is not allowed in shelter, including verbal abuse of children and physical abuse such as spanking. You will also be required to attend meetings where you will have a chance to talk about domestic violence, parenting (if you have children at the shelter), and concerns you have about staying in shelter.

How do I get into a shelter?

The first step is to call and speak with a staff person about why you need shelter. The shelter staff will ask how many children you have with you and they will tell you if they have space available. If there is space, a staff person will ask you to come in to do a shelter intake. This may take about an hour. The purpose of the intake is to decide if the shelter will be a safe place for you and your family, to share with you some guidelines of the program, and discuss how you will get to shelter. Some of the questions may seem very personal to you and other may seem unnecessary. It is important that you answer these questions honestly.

What will I need to take with me?

If possible, take items of sentimental or monetary value, paperwork, enough clothing for at least a week, food, diapers, and personal hygiene supplies. Shelters usually can provide highchairs, car seats, cribs, linens and bedding for you to use while staying at shelter. If you are unable to take food, clothing, diapers and personal hygiene supplies with you when you leave and do not have the resources to buy these items, you can expect that most shelters will be able to provide you with these supplies.

How Survivor Advocates Can Avoid Burnout

Secondary traumatic stress can affect those who help for a living

There are few things more rewarding than being able to provide the type of support and assistance to change, and maybe even save someone’s life. It’s easy to become invested in your clients’ safety, success, and well-being; often their joys and victories become yours. However, so can their despair and trauma.

“There are always certain cases you’ll feel more of an attachment to than others,” says Ambroes Pass-Turner, Ed.D., a clinically certified domestic violence counselor with a doctorate in counseling psychology. “We have a tendency to take it home with us even though we try not to.”

It can be called secondary trauma, burnout or compassion fatigue and can cause those providing assistance to people in crisis varying levels of the trauma of their own. It is not uncommon for advocates to experience symptoms of guilt, hopelessness, anger, irritability, sleeplessness, exhaustion, fear and social withdrawal after working with clients in crisis. This can often lead to career burnout.

To avoid the effects of burnout, be vigilant about these tips:

Be realistic. No one person, yourself included, will ever be able to end domestic violence forever. Don’t expect to do so. “It’s important to realize what you’re doing is necessary, but you have to find a balance,” says Eric Quarles, Ph.D., a criminal justice expert.

Set boundaries. Smartphones and our 24/7 culture make turning work off difficult, but you have to do it for your own sake. “When you leave your workplace, try to leave your work there,” Pass-Turner says.

Take care of your physical self. Physical health and mental health go hand in hand. Eat a balanced diet, get at least 30 minutes of exercise each day, don’t sacrifice sleep and go to the doctor regularly for checkups and screenings. The better you take care of yourself, the better you’ll be able to care for your clients.

Collaborate. Because much of the job is one-on-one, it’s easy to get stuck working in a vacuum, which can feel isolating. “I find it very helpful to talk with colleagues about what’s going on in certain cases,” Pass-Turner says. “I’m always asking ‘What am I missing?’ You never know what kinds of ideas or feedback you’ll get.”

Make new friends. It’s good to have colleagues to rely on and relate to, but they shouldn’t make up your entire social circle. “Expanding your social circle beyond your current profession is one of the first steps to being able to decompress,” Quarles says. It will help get your mind off work.

If you are wondering if you’re close to burnout, assess yourself with the Professional Quality of Life measure.

Recharge, Rejuvenate and Renew

A mind, body, and spirit cleanse for survivors and advocates.

Increased body toxins can occur as a result of things we consume, such as air, food, water and chemicals. Stress, anxiety, sadness and other emotions experienced by domestic violence survivors can also increase body toxins.

Mixed opinions on the impact of toxins and the importance of cleansing the body of toxins abound. However, some believe detoxification can recharge, rejuvenate and renew the mind, body and spirit, and play a role in a survivor’s restoration.

Regardless of which side of the debate you’re on, one thing that isn’t debatable is that the healing process for a survivor should involve a personalized recovery plan. You should do what works best for you, and body cleansing—or detoxification—may be an option to explore.

When you hear about cleansing these days, it is often talked about in the context of a brief change in diet. While that works for some, there are other activities you can put into play to produce a more holistic experience to create improved balance, harmony and total well-being.

For Your Mind

Meditation. Research has shown that meditation can reduce levels of stress and promote well-being. The primary goal of meditation is to obtain inner peace, which can be achieved by learning to quiet your mind. If you are a beginner, you may want to try guided meditations—listening to a recorded voice that helps you visualize images in your mind to help you relax and quiet the chatter in your mind. This can also help you to eliminate unhealthy thoughts and feelings.

For Your Body

External cleansing. Due to the many chemicals used in soap and cosmetic products on the market today, look for those containing natural ingredients. What you put on your body is absorbed through your skin and into your blood stream. EWG (Environmental Working Group) is a non-profit organization that has a large database of consumer products which contain toxic ingredients. Research the ingredients in the products you are using.

Internal Cleansing. There are natural ways to do an internal body cleanse without having to purchase expensive products from health food stores or websites. The Livestrong Foundation notes that a diet that emphasizes certain foods (e.g., fruits, vegetables, organic to limit pesticide exposure, and raw preparations to keep the fiber and nutrients intact) and eliminates others (e.g., caffeine, refined sugars and flours, alcohol, saturated fat and processed foods) can help achieve the objective. Also, it is important to drink plenty of water, which naturally cleanses the body.

For Your Spirit

Elements of Nature: Connecting with nature allows you to release stress. With summer upon us, it’s a good time to enjoy the outdoors. Water hydrates the body and cleanses it internally and externally. Consider submerging yourself in a nearby ocean, lake or river; participating in water sports; or just enjoy the tranquility each offers. Camping and hiking, or even something as simple as walking barefoot through the grass and feeling the coolness of the earth beneath your feet, can work.

When cleansing holistically, keep in mind that it is a process. Therefore you are not limited to the length of time you remain on a cleanse. You can practice these methods at your own pace to experience total well-being as you recover from the after-effects of abuse and live a happier, healthier life.

How to Set Up a Safe Home for Abused Women

According to the U.S. Department of Justice/Office of Justice Programs, between 600,000 and 6 million women are victims of domestic violence annually. Many abused women seek a safer place. Setting up a safe home for abused women in your area will go a long way in providing safety for women and their children escaping domestic abuse. This process entails finding a secure location, obtaining licensure, getting the right workers, obtaining funding and networking with related agencies.

1. Use a real estate agent to find a suitable location that complies with zoning requirements. Find local real estate agents through sites such as Real Estate Agents. Choose a safe, spacious house with several bedrooms, that is close to agencies that will provide services needed by the shelter, such as Legal Aid, churches, and the police department.

2. Start recruiting workers for the shelter. Work with volunteers from agencies such as churches and educational institutions. Use a recruiting agency to find qualified volunteers with experience in areas such as social work, psychology, and law. Hire an accountant and at least one advocate to assist in financial and legal matters.

3. Obtain a license to operate the shelter. Different states have different licensing agencies, but the department of health and human services or its equivalent is typically concerned with licensing safe homes. Provide information such as the name and address of the applicant, location of the shelter, the anticipated number of women to be housed, and the training and experience of the employees.

4. Apply for non-profit, 501(c)3 status to allow individuals and corporations to enjoy a tax deduction for contributions made toward the safe home. Download Form 1023, Application for Recognition of Exemption from the Internal Revenue Service, complete it and submit it with the required fee.

5. Form a governing board by enlisting interested community members from educational institutions, the business community, professional bodies such as community advocates, and religious institutions. Lay out the regulations on the tenure of office, compensation, roles and responsibilities of each board member.

6. Raise funds for the program by approaching your state domestic violence coalition and requesting funds under programs such as Family Violence Prevention and Services Act, the Victims of Crime Act, and the Violence Against Women Act.

7. Train employees on how to communicate with victims, offer telephone counseling and ensure women’s safety once they get to the safe house. Contact the state domestic violence coalition to request training services for your employees.

8. Network with other agencies such as local police and sheriff’s departments, Legal Aid, food pantries, soup kitchens, existing homeless shelters in your community (if any) and elected officials such as a congressperson. Approach these people and groups directly and enlist their assistance for the provision of volunteers, food, clothing, security services and working capital.

9. Get the program up and running by notifying the agencies in Step 7 about the new safe home for battered women. Provide them with contact information that women can use to reach the safe home. Prepare to receive women and their children by putting administrative volunteers, counselors and the advocate on standby to receive calls and to welcome the women.

The Artisan

It is the nature of the Artisan to express himself through the invention, creation, manufacture, repair, and manipulation of things. These can be artistic masterpieces, technological crafts, or mechanical devices. Virtually everything made by man which you see and use is the work of Artisans. The car you drive, the house you live in, the television you watch, the telephone you talk on, the clothes you wear, the furniture and appliances in your home and the decorations also, (the computer I am writing with!) — these are things that Artisans have invented, designed, drawn plans for, and built.

Artisans are impelled to make things. They get restless if they do not create something tangible. It is their nature to produce physical objects. They generate an idea, and from within themselves, they spew it out into material reality. They take the raw material in their hands and fashion it into things of beauty or function. Gadgets and gizmos are their stock in trade.

Artisans Are Multi-Faceted

Artisans are interested in how things work. As children, they often take things apart to see what is inside — “What makes it tick?” — then they put it back together again. They are good at this and have high “mechanical aptitudes.”  But Artisans are so multi-faceted that they can’t be boxed into a single field of expertise. They can be excellent artists, inventors, musicians, actors, writers, surgeons, architects, interior decorators, landscapers, or essentially any occupation that generates something new, different, and unique. They also excel at occupations that involve fixing or manipulating things that already exist, such as draftsmen, machinists, assemblers, mechanics, home builders, construction workers, painters, automakers, manufacturers, repairmen, technicians, electricians, plumbers, carpenters, cabinetmakers, and so on. 

In prehistoric times, Artisans were involved in such ancient arts as pottery-molding, basket weaving, weapons- and tool-making, cave painting, and hut-building. In historical times, an Artisan has typically made his livelihood in such occupations as blacksmith, craftsman, and tradesman — a member of a guild who passed his skills on to apprentices. There were numerous other cottage industries, and there was always use for a scribe when not everyone was literate. Whenever and wherever there is something that needs to be made, there is an Artisan — ready, willing, and able to make it. And whatever occupation an Artisan finds himself in, he will always apply a high degree of skill and expertise to it. Artisans are technicians in whatever they do.

Even if the Artisan does not have an engineering or technical job, he is likely to express his creative inclination in his hobby. People who have a workshop in their home are most likely to be Artisans. They read magazines of applied science like Mechanics Illustrated or Popular Science. These are the handymen of the world who know how to fix everything around the house from a leaky faucet to an electrical switch. They like to work on the car too. Artisans love tools and are likely to have a lot of them around. My father, an Artisan, can hardly resist a sale on tools, even if he doesn’t need them. Artisans are good with their hands in using these tools. In fact, metaphorically speaking, Artisans are the hands of the body of mankind. They like to manipulate whatever is within hand’s reach.

Artisans are very concerned with how one thing relates to another thing. They see the physical world as parts, working together. Indeed, they tend to view the entire universe as a giant machine. Physicists, as a general rule, are Artisans, seeking to understand how the machinery of the universe works. They analyze matter — take it apart piece by piece, molecule by molecule, atom by atom, subatomic particle by subatomic particle. They want to see how it all fits together, and how the parts relate to each other.

In the highest manifestation of their nature, the Positive Pole of +Creation, Artisans are inventors and artists. According to Michael, virtually all the engineering discoveries and artistic masterpieces down through history have been the work of Artisans. A list of some of these famous Artisans will demonstrate this. Botticelli, Paul Gaugin, Vincent Van Gogh, Jean Ingres, and Michelangelo were artist Artisans. Thomas Edison and Buckminster Fuller were inventor Artisans. Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton were physicist Artisans. B.F. Skinner also happens to be an Artisan, but he applied his technical skill to human engineering. He invented the theory of psychology called Behaviorism, which proposes a mechanistic model of human consciousness and function.

Self Image

Artisans have a certain self-image problem. They don’t want attention on themselves. If they care to be acknowledged or remembered at all, it is that they want to be considered for their work’s sake. In effect, they say, “Here, look at this thing, not at me. See what I made. I am not of any consequence, except to the extent that I have created this thing of beauty and usefulness.” They live to make something tangible and permanent which will outlive themselves. Artisans are therefore somewhat shy. They do not like to attract attention to themselves by being before an audience, for instance. It is uncomfortable for them to talk about themselves, but they will talk about their work, their creations.  This shyness also means they tend to be aloof and detached from other people and from the environment. They tend to feel like strangers and aliens in the world.

This objectivity and mental detachment of Artisans has its advantages and disadvantages. Their ability to view themselves as an object of criticism allows them to receive criticism from others without taking it too personally and getting upset. On the other hand, because of their sense of separation and indifference, in their worst expression Artisans can be unperturbed by the thoughts and feelings of other people as they concentrate their mental energy on the creation or manipulation of inanimate matter. Here is the manifestation of the “techno-nerd”. It is not that they are unaware of what others think (because they are outwardly focused), but since they see themselves as detached from others, and as rather insignificant parts of a huge mechanistic universe, it doesn’t matter what others think about them. This is in contrast to Sages, who are very much concerned to have their audience appreciate them. Artisans are concerned with the substance rather than the image of life.  This outward focus of attention upon the physical world also means that Artisans are often unaware of their own inner workings. They may very well be out of touch with themselves.

The Artisan’s Natural Over-leaves

Like a person with the Goal of Discrimination, the Artisan can be rather picky and critical at times, especially about his own work. He seeks to create something unique, that no one else has made. He throws away things that do not express his identity purely or with integrity. As a consequence, Artisans tend to specialize -to come to know more and more about less and less — rather than generalize. Like a person in the Caution Mode, an Artisan is meticulous in his work and careful in his behavior. He is interested in the details of things. Like a person with the Self-destruction Feature, an Artisan is usually aware of his flaws, and why invest anything in something as defective as himself? He often neglects himself as a work of art because his focus of awareness is on the outer world. The Artisan sees himself as a very little cog in a giant machine. His attention is focused on the external universe — and look how big the universe is, and how small he is compared to it. So he thinks of himself as expendable. He derives his fulfillment from making a significant change in the big universe, or adding something new to it, even if he has to spend himself to do it. If he expresses himself Positively, he can be picky about looking clean and neat. If Negatively, he will be nerdish. Artisans usually dislike spending money on themselves. They do not often indulge their personal desires. Such expenditure can only be justified if it also involves a contribution to the universe. Like a Skeptic, an Artisan is prone to think that “this (physical universe) is all there is” — he is prone to believe only what he sees with his own eyes, holds in his own hands. You have to prove it to him with tangible evidence, scientific instrumentation, and impeccable logic. Like a person in the Intellectual Center, an Artisan is primarily mental in nature. He thinks about things a lot, and everything has to make sense to him in a rational, reasonable way.

Few Artisans are pillars of strength, and even though they often like to be of help to others, they do not like to be leaned on. The problem here seems to be that Artisans are themselves somewhat fragmented. They are brittle and easily broken, in a manner of speaking, therefore unable to hold others together. Of the Roles, Artisans have the hardest time “getting their act together”. Consequently, they may not have what it takes to assist others in integration. Their probable lack of attention to finding out what methods are suitable for their own well-being contributes to the flaw that they may not have the solution to the problems of others either. Sometimes this is what a person needs in the way of help.

Artisans view the world as their model. This means several things. It means that an Artisan sees the universe as the ultimate pattern after which he should shape his own created objects. Often an Artisan will copy something in his arts or engineering that he sees in nature. It also means that the Artisan views the universe as an object which it is his job to mold, form, and fashion into a work of beauty or function. This is certainly something that Artisans do. In another sense, it means that Artisans see themselves as creations of the universe, rather than creators of themselves. Sages, on the other hand, are partial to the idea that they create their own reality, both internal and external, by their imaginations. I believe all the above are true statements about Artisans.