Vanilla Infused Jojoba

Making your own vanilla infused jojoba is easy!

Add about a half of an ounce of vanilla oleoresin (1 tablespoon) to a gallon of jojoba (3.75 liters). After about two weeks, your jojoba will be infused with the rich aroma of the vanilla.

You can let this oleoresin sit in the gallon until you finish using the jojoba. I’ve refilled that same gallon jug with more jojoba, and the vanilla continues to do its magic!

If you don’t have the oleoresin, you can use about 10 fresh vanilla bean pods. After the two weeks of infusing, take the pods out of the gallon jug of jojoba. You’ll need new ones if you want to start the process again.

Lip Balm
a delicious and soothing vanilla and citrus lip balm

10 drops distilled Lime (Citrus aurantifolia)
5 drops Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis)
1 oz (28 gm) Beeswax (Cera alba)
1 oz (30 ml) Vanilla-infused jojoba wax (Simmondsia chinensis)
2 oz (56 gm) Coconut oil (Cocos nucifera)
Lip balm tubes (the size is about 5 ml)
Lip balm tray

Directions:

  1. Melt 1 oz (28 gm) beeswax and 1 oz (30 ml) vanilla jojoba in a double boiler.
  2. Once melted, add 2 oz (56 gm) coconut oil.
  3. Once melted, take off the stove and add the Lime and Orange essential oils.
  4. Stir and pour immediately (or use a pipette or dropper) into lip balm tubes (this is easiest if you have a lip balm tray for holding the tubes while you pour).

For a double boiler, try a Pyrex measuring cup rested in a soup pot filled halfway with water. This recipe makes about 24 sticks if you use a 5 ml size tube. How many tubes you fill will vary according to how high you fill them, and how exact you (and your scale) are when you weigh your ingredients.

Vanilla and Lavender Salt Scrub
a skin soothing shower scrub

3 oz (84 gm) salts (I like 2 oz/56 gm of pink Himalayan salts mixed with 1 oz/28 gm of Epsom salts)
3 oz (90 ml) vanilla jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis)
1 oz (28 gm) dried organic lavender flowers
15 drops Lavender essential oil (Lavandula angustifolia)
4 oz (120 ml) jar

Directions:

  1. Grind all the salts and the lavender flowers in a small coffee grinder until they are a fine texture. (I have a separate grinder reserved for bath salts, as coffee tasting like vanilla and lavender bath salts can be a bummer first thing in the morning!)
  2. Add the vanilla jojoba to the salts and stir.
  3. Add your essential oils and mix.

I recommend making a fresh batch of salt scrub every few weeks.

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Palmarosa Essential Oil

Palmarosa is a very skin-protective essential oil.

In “The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy,” Salvatore Battaglia says that it hydrates skin, has antiseptic properties, balances all skin types regulates sebum production (the oil that your skin produces) and can stimulate cellular regeneration.

Palmarosa essential oil is also deeply supportive of restoring strength, opening your heart, and boosting immunity. It’s perfect for massage sessions and warm baths right before bed (when its soothing influence on the nervous system help you slip off to sleep).

Here are a few Palmarosa blends that can help you get to know this essential oil like a friend.

Use Palmarosa essential oil in a natural bug spray.

Going for walks, spending time outside with friends, or working in your garden can be so relaxing . . . assuming you don’t get eaten alive by bugs!

That’s where Palmarosa essential oil can help. It’s very protective of your personal space and repels insects that might bite or sting your skin. I like to use it in natural bug repellent.

Here’s one of my favorite recipes. Combine these ingredients in a 4 oz (120 ml) spray bottle:

  • 4 oz (120 ml) German Chamomile hydrosol (Matricaria recutita)
  • 8 drops Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini motia)
  • 8 drops Spikenard (Nardostachys jatamansi)
  • 4 drops Patchouli (Pogostemom cablin)
  • 6 drops Cedarwood (Juniperus virginiana)

This blend smells amazing! It has no harsh scents that can sometimes “repel” people from bug repellents. I recommend making a fresh bottle of it every few weeks since it’s not made with a preservative.

 


 

Add Palmarosa to soothing massage blends and bath oils.

Have you ever had a massage and felt so relaxed, reassured, and healthy afterward—but found yourself wishing for another massage a few days later?

One way to re-inspire that sense of comfort is to use the same aroma in a bath salt that was used during your massage. Scent affects the limbic system (the seat of our emotions), so our bodies respond to it quickly.

I’d like to share an essential oil blend that you can use in a base of jojoba massage oil as well as bath salts:

  • 6 drops Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini motia)
  • 4 drops Patchouli (Pogostemom cablin)

You can blend those oils into a base of either:

  • For massage oil: 1 oz (30 ml) jojoba wax (Simmondsia chinensis)
  • For a bath salt: 1 oz (30 ml) natural salts (I like pink Himalayan salts) and 1 tablespoon of jojoba wax

To make your massage oil, add the essential oils and jojoba to a 1 oz (30 ml) glass jar, close the lid, and shake.

To make your bath salt, simply put the salt in a 1 oz (30 ml) container, and drop the oils and jojoba right into the salt, stirring as you go. This makes enough for two baths (I use about 5 drops of essential oil per bath), but if you like the blend you can increase the recipe. The bath salt doesn’t include a preservative, so if you do increase the recipe just be sure to make a fresh jar every few weeks.


 

Dust mites don’t like Palmarosa!

Dust mites. Nobody wants to talk about them because nobody feels like they can do anything about them.

Dust mites live on dust, which is easily collected by your bed linens (and upholstery, and carpet, and all over your house!). They cause a lot of allergies.

Fortunately, there are natural ways to reduce dust mite infestations. The Mayo Clinic has a great list of tips.

In 2008, a study published in the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology demonstrated that dust mites do not like geraniol, a naturally occurring component in many essential oils. Spray geraniol on a piece of linen, and dust mites will vacate the area.

Palmarosa essential oil has a very high concentration of geraniol. So guess what you can use it for?

Here’s an excellent linen spray recipe that helps keep those dust mites away!

  • 8 oz (240 ml) water in a spray bottle
  • 60 drops Palmarosa essential oil (Cymbopogon martini motia)
  • 20 drops Lavender essential oil (Lavandula angustifolia)

To get the most out of your linen spray, first, wash your linens in very hot water. Then use the spray several times a day. The ingredients are very skin-friendly and relaxing, so it’s nice to wrap yourself up in the sheets at the end of the day.

I recommend making a fresh bottle of this blend every few weeks since it’s not made with a preservative.


 

Four cooling summer blends with Palmarosa essential oil.

Palmarosa is a great essential oil to use for summer Aromatherapy blends! It’s cooling and soothing, can repel insects (and those smaller “bugs”—microbes), and supports immunity.

So I’ve got four suggestions for blends you can make with Palmarosa to get a head start on summer.

  • A jojoba massage oil (Simmondsia chinensis)
  • A body cream to help you sleep (You can use your favorite unscented natural cream.)
  • A bedtime bath salt (I like pink Himalayan salt.)
  • A linen spray (1 oz/30 ml of water is a great base.)

Now I’m going to share a few great essential oils to use together in these carriers, and let you get creative with coming up with your own aromas. Try Palmarosa with Sandalwood in the massage oil, or Palmarosa and Patchouli in the bath salt. Just add one drop at a time to each blend, to be sure you like the aroma you’re creating.

  • Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini motia)
  • Sandalwood (Santalum paniculatum)
  • Patchouli (Pogostemom cablin)
  • Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha)
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

The rule of thumb when blending for children is to use about 5 to 6 drops of essential oil for every 1 oz (30 ml) of the carrier.

For adults, you can use 10 to 15 drops for every 1 oz (30 ml) of the carrier.

For the body cream and linen spray, I suggest making your blends fresh every few weeks, since they are not made with preservatives.


 

Palmarosa is a great ingredient for natural soaps.

One of Palmarosa essential oil’s main components is geraniol, which makes it especially cooling, antifungal, and destructive to viruses and bacteria.

Does it sound like a great ingredient for natural homemade soap? (It is!)

Here’s a recipe for luxurious foam soap you can use in your office or bathroom. It also makes a great travel soap.

  • 40 ml castile soap
  • 10 drops Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini motia)
  • 10 drops Lemon (Citrus limon)
  • 2 drops Peppermint (Mentha x piperita)

You can make this blend in a 50 ml foam soap pump (which I like to get at Aromatics International). Once you pour the castile soap into the bottle, you’ll see there’s a little room left—that’s intentional because when you screw on the lid, the liquid will rise (you don’t want it to spill over).

This foam soap is especially reliable if you’ve got any cuts or scrapes on your hands. Its anti-inflammatory and bacteria reducing effects are gentle, yet effective.


 

Get to know Palmarosa.

Palmarosa essential oil’s gentle effect on skin, combined with its strong actions against germs and microbes, makes it a wonderful go-to oil for a wide variety of potent yet nourishing blends. And it smells amazing!

Laurel Essential Oil

Laurel Leaf essential oil has a fresh, spicy scent that opens your lungs and your mind.

It’s invigorating and inspiring.

Laurel has a host of therapeutic properties. I like to remember that it’s associated with achievement and victory. So it’s a great helper when it comes to clearing away anything that stands between you and your best—that’s why it’s good for healing so many issues! (That’s how I like to think of it, anyway!)

Stay focused and clear with Laurel.

I especially love using Laurel for decongestion and mental focus. It is the perfect companion when you have a cold or allergies but still have to go to work.

Use 5 drops of this stock blend in your diffuser.

Ingredients:

  • 10 drops Laurel (Laurus nobilis)
  • 10 drops Rosemary ct. camphor (Rosmarinus officinalis ct. camphor)
  • 20 drops White Spruce (Picea glauca)
  • 10 drops Distilled Lime (Citrus aurantifolia)

 


 

Massage sore muscles with Laurel Leaf essential oil.

The Laurel Extra Mile Massage Blend

Have you ever seen someone win a race and be crowned with Laurel leaves? This is a practice from ancient times that has survived to today.

When we think of Laurel Leaf essential oil (sometimes called Bay Laurel or Sweet Laurel), we can think of a cheering section to help us stay energized and go the distance.

So if you need a massage oil for sore muscles, perhaps resulting from a cold or flu (Laurel is excellent for respiratory issues!), Laurel is a great choice for your blend. It soothes, encourages, and energizes.

Here’s a recipe you can try during your next massage.

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz (60 ml) jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis)
  • 6 drops Laurel (Laurus nobilis)
  • 8 drops Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ct camphor)
  • 15 drops Orange (Citrus sinensis)

 


 

Use Laurel Leaf for respiratory health.

When I make a blend for respiratory support, I know I can rely on essential oils that contain the chemical component 1,8 cineole.

1,8 cineole is antiviral, antimicrobial, mucolytic, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory. It’s present in oils like Laurel Leaf and Eucalyptus, which are famous respiratory helpers.

Here’s a recipe for one of my favorite Aromatherapy inhalers that I use to support my lungs and sinuses. I carry my inhaler with me and use it to prevent myself from getting sick. If I’ve forgotten to bring it along and happen to get sick, I rely on it even more.

Stay Healthy Inhaler

  • 3 drops Laurel Leaf (Laurus nobilis)
  • 5 drops Saro (Cinnamosma fragrans)
  • 4 drops Ravintsara (Cinnamomum camphora ct. 1,8 cineole)

Directions

You can get blank Aromatherapy inhalers at Amazon. They look like little lip balm tubes, and inside there is a cotton insert. Just drop your essential oils on the cotton insert, then snap the inhaler closed. To use it, just raise it to one nostril, pinching the other closed, and inhale.

 


 

Wash up with Laurel Leaf essential oil.

Laurel Leaf essential oil doesn’t want anything to slow you down, least of all a cold. It’s a wonderful anti-infectious agent, so it can “deactivate” microbes before they get in your system.

That’s why it’s the perfect ingredient for foam soap.

Here’s a recipe that’s easy to make, and perfect for the bathroom sink. You’ll need a 2 oz (60 ml) foam pump bottle.

Laurel Orange Foam SoapLaurel Orange Foam Soap

  • 2 oz (60 ml) castile soap
  • 6 drops Laurel (Laurus nobilis)
  • 15 drops Orange (Citrus sinensis)
  • 10 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Directions:

I’ll bet you can guess the blending directions on this one! (Just put everything in the soap pump. Easy, right?)

You can find foam soap pumps at Amazon They have two sizes—50 ml and 250 ml. This recipe is for a 50 ml bottle. You’ll notice that the Castile soap doesn’t quite fill the bottle to the top. That’s because when you put the lid on, the liquid will rise, and if it’s too high it could overspill.

 


 

Get to know Laurel.

Spend a little time blending with Laurel, and you may find yourself connecting with it in more ways and getting different blending ideas.

Lavender Essential Oil

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is probably the most famous essential oil for relaxation and soothing nerves . . . if not the most famous essential oil hands down!

That’s because it’s gentle and so good for a wide range of issues.

Emotionally, it’s good for “calming the mind, comforting feelings and alleviating fears, while it is uplifting and revives the spirits.” (That’s from Salvatore Battaglia’s excellent book, The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy.)

Below, I’ll share some of the many applications of Lavender essential oil, including when to use it and then some specific recipes that you can use in your Aromatherapy blends. 

1. Help kids keep calm and collected with Lavender.

Lavender may be powerful, but it’s also very gentle, and it’s one of the oils I trust the most in blends for children.

Here’s an Aromatherapy inhaler recipe for kids (over five years old) who experience anxiety.

Ingredients

  • 2 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
  • 3 drops Cedarwood (Juniperus virginiana)
  • 2 drops Tangerine (Citrus tangerina)

 

Want a version for grown-ups?

Ingredients

  • 3 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
  • 6 drops Juniper (Juniperus communis)
  • 6 drops Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)

2. Lavender keeps everything smelling fresh.

The word “lavender” comes from the Latin word “lavare,” which means “to wash.” That’s because, in Ancient Rome, it was used to help freshen laundry.

Lavender’s scent is strong yet soothing. How strong? Well, strong enough to sweeten laundry way back when! And I’m about to share a recipe for a bathroom spray, which has to have a strong sweet scent.

Sweet Bathroom Lavender SprayIngredients

  • 1 oz (30 ml) water
  • 10 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
  • 5 drops distilled Lime (Citrus aurantifolia)

Here’s a tip: Try this spray on your shower curtain and towels, so when you step into and out of the shower or wrap yourself up in a towel, you get a whiff of the aroma!

 

 

3. Lavender keeps sore muscles feeling fresh, too!

Lavender can support our wellness and can help with a variety of issues, including muscle pain and inflammation.

If you want to use Lavender in massage oil blend to ease tight muscles, here is a recipe I love!

Lavender Sore Muscle RubIngredients

  • 1 oz (30 ml) Trauma Oil (This is olive oil infused with three healing herbs: arnica, St. John’s wort, and calendula.)
  • 4 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
  • 4 drops Ho Wood (Cinnamomum camphora ct. linalol)
  • 5 drops Bergamot Mint (Mentha citrata)
  • 5 drops Coriander (Coriandrum sativum)

Directions
Make your blend in a 1 oz (30 ml) glass bottle. Massage sore areas several times a day at the onset of pain. Continue until symptoms are eased.

 

4. Lavender loves the skin!

It’s nourishing to most skin types, is soothing to bites, burns, scrapes, and bruises, and eases irritation, such as rashes. It is antiseptic, can help calm infection, and it has some antifungal properties. It helps to reduce scars and inflammation and promotes healthy skin.

Convinced yet?

It goes without saying that if you like Lavender, it’s a great choice for body butter and body oils. Shea butter and coconut oil are popular carriers, but there are a host of less common carrier oils and butter that have amazing skin nourishing properties that pair well with Lavender, too.

Here’s a recipe for body butter with some unique carriers (and qualities!).

Exotic Cocoa Lavender Body ButterIngredients

  • 1 oz (28 gm) Avocado Oil (Persea gratissima) – Increase skin’s hydration and elastic properties
  • 1 oz (28 gm) baobab oil (Adansonia digitata) – Reduce scars and help cells regenerate
  • 2 oz (56 gm) cocoa butter (Theobroma cacao) – Full of antioxidants, excellent for mature skin
  • 1 oz (28 gm) marula oil (Sclerocarya birrea) – Promote health of skin cell membranes
  • 1 oz (28 gm) Beeswax (Cera Alba) – Softens skin, offers antioxidants
  • 60 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) – good for sore muscles, keeping you centered and focused (plus all the other benefits listed above!)

Each of these carriers has more therapeutic properties than I was able to list here, so I only highlighted a few. For example, they all soothe irritation, moisturize, and they’re all great for even sensitive skin.

The scent of this blend is like chocolate and Lavender—just delicious!